Author: Christopher Olola, PhD

Is There any Correlation between Over/Under Triage and Number of Consecutive Working Hours in the Emergency Medical Communication Center?

There are many recent articles published in scientific literature on the topic of work-related stress. However, these studies focus on the effects of stress on the workers and not on the impact that stress could have on their work performance—more specifically on the calltaker’s (emergency dispatcher (ED)) performance and consequently on the whole Emergency Medical Service (EMS). : The objective of this study was to assess whether the number of consecutive hours worked (WH) by the EMDs had an impact on their performance, in terms of case evaluations, and on...

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Factors Contributing to Stress Levels of Emergency Dispatchers

There is now substantial research literature on the occupational stress among emergency dispatchers from multiple studies that have cited dispatcher claims of significant emotional, mental, and physical stress as a result of their work. However, there is very little literature that ranks in order of prevalence or severity the factors contributing to overall stress specific to emergency dispatchers. The aim of this study is to collect data that will complement other research findings in this field to inform the development of new programs designed to address specific...

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Emergency Communication Nurses’ Ability to Correctly Select Abdominal Pain as the Appropriate Protocol in Telephonic Nurse Triage System

Download Original Paper Abdominal pain is the most common symptom with which patients present to the emergency department (ED), and overall visits to EDs in the U.S. are growing twice as fast as the overall population. Interventions that can safely mitigate such a high usage of ED resources would be a great asset in the delivery of effective and efficient ED care. One such intervention is a secondary triage of patients calling 911 for an ambulance who were subsequently triaged as a non-urgent low-acuity caller. Emergency medical services (EMS) using secondary...

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Falls Protocol Lift Assist Calls: Predictors of Repeat 911 Calls

Download Original Paper Emergency Medical Services (EMS) regularly respond to lift assist calls. Previous studies have shown lift assist calls present a significant risk of morbidity and mortality. This group of callers is also likely to make repeated calls to 911 for EMS assistance. The ability to foresee which of these patients may need to call 911 again within 24 hours could help decrease the risk posed to patients in these situations. s: To 1) describe calls originating as lift assist calls with repeat calls within 24 hours, 2) explore the...

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