The Impact of 911 Telecommunications on Family and Social Interaction

Several studies explore the link between emergency response work and compassion fatigue, burnout, and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). In each study, the connection between the challenging and traumatic nature of the workload and its effect on the responder are explored to explain certain behaviors, or changes. This study covers a different side of the impact of the work of emergency telecommunicators. Focused on the effects of the load brought home by telecommunicators, the study outlines perceived changes family members of telecommunicators notice during their tenure as...

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Factors Contributing to Stress Levels of Emergency Dispatchers

There is now substantial research literature on the occupational stress among emergency dispatchers from multiple studies that have cited dispatcher claims of significant emotional, mental, and physical stress as a result of their work. However, there is very little literature that ranks in order of prevalence or severity the factors contributing to overall stress specific to emergency dispatchers. The aim of this study is to collect data that will complement other research findings in this field to inform the development of new programs designed to address specific...

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9-1-1: What’s our emergency? Diagnosing a struggling occupation serving a neglected system: a systematic literature review

In 2019, of all of U.S. states/territories, only twelve require the Emergency Communications Officer (ECO) to meet hiring (character) standards, only twenty-nine require basic training standards, only twenty-three require continuing-education standards, and only twenty-four require use of pre-arrival medical instruction protocols. Furthermore, the federal government misclassifies the profession within its Office and Administrative Support occupational grouping, as opposed to the Protective Service occupational grouping. There is substantial evidence of 9-1-1 failures in...

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Emergency Communication Nurses’ Ability to Correctly Select Abdominal Pain as the Appropriate Protocol in Telephonic Nurse Triage System

Download Original Paper Abdominal pain is the most common symptom with which patients present to the emergency department (ED), and overall visits to EDs in the U.S. are growing twice as fast as the overall population. Interventions that can safely mitigate such a high usage of ED resources would be a great asset in the delivery of effective and efficient ED care. One such intervention is a secondary triage of patients calling 911 for an ambulance who were subsequently triaged as a non-urgent low-acuity caller. Emergency medical services (EMS) using secondary...

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Falls Protocol Lift Assist Calls: Predictors of Repeat 911 Calls

Download Original Paper Emergency Medical Services (EMS) regularly respond to lift assist calls. Previous studies have shown lift assist calls present a significant risk of morbidity and mortality. This group of callers is also likely to make repeated calls to 911 for EMS assistance. The ability to foresee which of these patients may need to call 911 again within 24 hours could help decrease the risk posed to patients in these situations. s: To 1) describe calls originating as lift assist calls with repeat calls within 24 hours, 2) explore the...

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Identifying Working Structure Fires Using a Standardized Fire Dispatch Protocol System

Structure fires, although infrequent, require significant resources and personnel to effectively complete critical tasks in a short time frame to achieve positive outcomes. While it is important to dispatch the appropriate number of resources rapidly, there is a risk to over-allocate responding resources both to the public and to the responders by responding with lights and siren. A standardized emergency fire dispatch (EFD) protocol-based system is important to quickly identify working structures fires so appropriate resources are allocated in an effective manner—and...

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Using a Mobile Application to Address Stress-Related Symptoms in Emergency Dispatchers

Download PDF Emergency dispatchers report significant job stress, yet few controlled investigations examine their specific psychological complaints. Additionally, research examining the use of interventions directed at alleviating their work-related stress is limited. : This study aims to examine the efficacy and feasibility of a mobile application (PTSD Coach) on various indicators of psychosocial well-being among emergency telecommunicator dispatchers. Methods: A sample of 117 emergency dispatchers attending the 2018 NAVIGATOR conference agreed to...

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Measuring the Impact of Training on Emergency Medical Dispatcher Management of General Mental Crisis Calls and Suicide Calls

Download PDF Historically, 911 professionals have not received specialized training in dispatch and call management related to mental crises and suicidality. This lack of training may contribute to lack of confidence and elevated anxiety in successfully handling these call types. A new model of training, Emergency Mental Health Dispatching™ (EMHD), which aims to equip 911 professionals to manage these calls has been developed to address this need. : The objective of this case study was to measure the impact of EMHD via two specific aims. The first aim...

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Evaluating the Effect of Proper Use of “Tell Me Exactly What Happened” on Chief Complaint Selection and Information Gathering at Emergency Police Dispatch

Download PDF When evaluating the information provided by 911 callers, Emergency Police Dispatchers (EPDs) use scripted protocols to ensure that important details are not missed and that questions are not omitted. Specifically, at the beginning of the call, EPDs ask callers to “Tell me exactly what happened” (TMEWH). Since EPDs must select the correct Chief Complaint (CC) Protocol based on the caller’s response, getting a complete response to TMEWH—and interpreting it correctly—is one of the most significant elements of an EPD’s job. However, no studies have...

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A Systematic Review of the Relationship Between Ambulant Status and the Need for a Lights-and-Siren Ambulance Response to Crashes

Download PDF Motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) can result in life-threatening injuries, and ambulances are therefore often dispatched at the highest priority response of lights­ and-siren (L&S). However, assigning L&S ambulance response based on type of incident alone may result in over-triage, meaning that the patient’s condition did not warrant L&S ambulance response. Potentially, the ambulatory status of the MVC patient at the scene (i.e., whether they can walk) could help inform the ambulance dispatch priority, given that ambulation reflects...

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